Whisper

One of the things I love about what I do is that it’s real. “Real, what’s real?” you may be asking, “that is such a broad generalised statement to make.”

Yes I agree, and one of the things I love about what I do is that it’s real šŸ™‚

I’m not sure if it’s by nature or by design that people who are involved inĀ Agile coaching have decided to challenge so-called accepted ways of working and being to help teams collaborate and achieve great things through the power of “we”.

You can recognise an Agile coach by the amounts of “we” in their conversation. This is what makes this community such an awesome one be a part of. Yes, we do travel around the world working and learning and we challenge the status quo of eschewing offices. Most of our bases are at home. If we’re not at a client we’reĀ at our home offices.

Some people call us hippies and this is their need to order their reality by putting people in boxes. We don’t believe in boxes. We believe in people. People don’t fit in boxes because we are not box-shaped. We are all sizes and not all sizes fits all.

Agile is slowly starting to become more usedĀ – I’m reluctant to say “mainstream” because this would mean trying to put it in a box where it is supposed to be better than other ways of working which are not “mainstream”. Who and what determines that something is mainstream or not. And if something is not mainstream does it mean that it is not good or effective or “hippie-like”?

Take the conference I’m at the moment.Ā It’s an unconference using Open Space Technology. We, the participants, are the ones to determine the conference programme. Anyone can propose a session and host it. It’s about what I want to learn and share with the community.

It’s a place where I can experiment with coaching techniques I’ve been thinking of applying. I know that I will get good feedback and a space to improve it.

I read an article today that reported that the US government is widely adopting Agile software development methods. This gladdens my Agile coach heart.

Two of my colleagues at this conference have brought their 2 cute kids to the conference – a months old baby and a little girl of about 4 years old. They are in the conference room with us and there is no need for them to whisper because they are part of their parent’s system – so it’s important to acknowledge this. Once organisations start seeing their people as systems, part of a bigger system that transcends the nine to five (and not as resources on their clock to move around at will) our workplaces will become much happier places. Happy people make happy workplaces make happy families make happy societies. Happy societies have more empathy.

Imagine what we could do with more empathy in the world. The possibilities are endless. So I go back to what I said at the beginning of this article –Ā one of the things I love about what I do is that it’s real. And theseĀ areĀ someĀ of the things that make it real for me.

Thanks for reading.

2 thoughts on “Whisper”

  1. I am getting curious to know more about the agile culture and the community. From what I have read, I understand that agile community focuses doesn’t revolve around a single person but revolves around the whole community and there is no I, you and they. The only thing present is “We”. It shows a strong sign of unity and powe of unity is not unknown to anyone.
    Bharat Sharma recently posted…16 Beauty Benefits Of Avocados For Skin And HairMy Profile

    1. Teams are important constructs in agile and the team succeeds or fails as a whole. When a team is working in this way, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Doing things in small chunks and having fast feedback loops enables the team to learn and adapt for the benefit of the customer. If you are interested take a look at https://www.agilealliance.org/agile101/ – it is now being adopted in non-software contexts – this is very exciting šŸ™‚

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