Photo Essay: Convento Do Carmo In Lisbon

I’ve been meaning to visit the ruins of the Convento do Carmo for years and this year took a detour on my way home to explore it from the outside. It’s situated in the Largo do Carmo, off course 🙂

Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins

It now houses the Lisbon archaeological museum.

Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins

The ruins are bold and imposing, dominating the upwards vista on one side of Rossio Plaza looking up the hill towards Bairro Alto.

Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins

Built in the Gothic style from 1389 to 1423, the Convento do Carmo (Carmo Convent) was mostly destroyed on 1 November 1755, the date of the catastrophic earthquake that razed Lisbon to the ground.

Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins

Despite the destruction, the ruins are breath-taking. I didn’t go in, choosing instead to explore the exterior. I am leaving that for the next visit.

Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins
Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins
Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins
Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins

The Castelo De S.Jorge is visible through the flying buttress. The convent has five  flying buttresses.

Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins

It was one of the largest and most ambitious architectural projects Lisbon had undertaken up until that time, both in terms of complexity of design and the numbers of people needed to construct it.

Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins

There were more than a few technical difficulties, starting with the foundations but also with the flying buttresses which collapsed twice.

Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins

It was commissioned by D. Nuno Álvares Pereira and handed over to Gomes Martins (no relation) to complete.

Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins

After the initial technical difficulties, it was handed over to three brothers to complete – Eanes, Afonso, Rodrigo and Gonçalo – who were master builders and stone masons.

Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins

One of the best preserved parts of the convent is the facade.

Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins
Convento do Carmo, Lisboa
©2017 Regina Martins

After years of looking up at the ruins, what I eventually found was certainly a surprise, especially the views of the Castelo de S.Jorge and downtown central Lisbon.

When you visit Lisbon it has got to be on your itinerary. I insist 🙂

 

WordPress Weekly Photo: Surprise

Walking down Rua do Alecrim in Lisbon I passed a derelict building and had to look at it twice to make sure my eyes weren’t deceiving me – and was taken by surprise – a very pleasant one because the statement made by the artist is right up my street.

Security check. Materials: fear and submission by Forest Dump ©2017 Regina Martins

Street art is not elitist and reaches all kinds of people, according to the artist. Some people are touched by the statement and stop and think, while others walk on by.

Social statement. ©2017 Regina Martins

The artist says that his work is sometimes unauthorised. He is inspired by outdoor spaces, where his art resides. Some of his exhibits last a few hours and others a few weeks.

Surprise… ©2017 Regina Martins

He likes being anonymous because it gives him more freedom of expression.

©2017 Regina Martins

The artist says he’s been changing streets to the way he wants them to look like for a long time.

Quote by the artist:

Lately, I’ve been feeling that the world is being searched by fear. Governments choose intolerant and discriminatory measures and police practice invasive attitudes on the minorities. The word SECURITY nowadays can knockdown the concept of individual privacy. This control freak machine keeps working as the tank is constantly refilled with fear, should we keep lowing our heads and spread our hands against the wall?


Info on the artist obtained from this article – Meet Forest Dump – The Nature Fan.

 

Pink Is The Colour Of Spring

Pink was everywhere in Lisbon. Pink blossoms on the trees, pink houses, and pink roadways. I therefore conclude that pink is the colour of spring in beautiful Lisbon. Just take a look at these pics.

Pink roadway promising festivities
©2017 Regina Martins
Pink toned graffiti on the elevator tram
©2017 Regina Martins
Pink elevator tram
©2017 Regina Martins
Pink paintwork
©2017 Regina Martins
Pink house
©2017 Regina Martins
Pink blossoms, the colour of Spring in Lisbon
©2017 Regina Martins

 

WordPress Weekly Photo: Security

For this week’s WordPress challenge I searched through my archives and found this pic. I battled a bit finding a photo that means security for me. All I could think about was burglar bars and electric fences. Now if you’re South African, you’ll resonate I’m sure. And that’s not a happy photo at all.

So I chose this one – of the brass bell and I think lighthouse (although it does seem a bit small) at the mouth of Kalk Bay harbour. I don’t think it is to warn ship out at sea, but rather to guide the fishing boats into the harbour, the bell on the one side of the harbour wall, and the light on the other, keeping them safe and secure.

Kalk Bay harbour
©2017 Regina Martins

 

Social Entrepreneur, chief wide eyed in wanderer, wonderer and bottlewasher…

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