Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Places People Visit

This series is all about colours, and what better place to visit than Thailand, which is ALL about colour! It wasn’t easy choosing which photos to show here…people aren’t afraid of colour in Thailand! I think we can all take a leaf from the Thai people and embrace colour – I’m sure that our world will be a lot happier…

From the cars…

I loved the colourful taxis in Bangkok, yellow, white and pink. Thai people certainly aren’t afraid of colour…
©2018 Regina Martins

To the waiting area at the train station…

Waiting for a train couldn’t be more colourful – the large public waiting area, made less bleak by the colourful purple seats and murals close to the vaulted ceiling, at Bangkok Central Station
©2018 Regina Martins

The golden Buddha…

The golden Buddha at Wat Traimit weighs 5.5 tons (5,500 kilograms). It’s quite a sight
©2018 Regina Martins
A worshipper, praying at the feet of the golden Buddha at Wat Traimit
©2018 Regina Martins

…and chanting monks…

Chanting monks at Wat Po in Bangkok. It was so relaxing listening to them, I could’ve stayed there all day
©2018 Regina Martins

…to the temples…

The magnificent Wat Po temple known for its reclining Buddha, its feet covered with mother-of-pearl engravings of Buddhist symbols. This is also the birthplace of traditional Thai massage
©2018 Regina Martins

and waterfalls

One of the 7 levels of the unbelievably breathtaking Erawan Falls, one of the most beautiful waterfalls in the world. Its seven tiers offer a unique experience at every climb, reaching up to 1,500m (4921 ft)
©2018 Regina Martins

Old trains

The old train, still with wooden seats painted in colourful yellow, takes us through part of the Death Railway where so many POWs lost their lives during the Japanese occupation in WW2
©2018 Regina Martins

and hotel rooms…

A welcome sight after a day of travel and sightseeing…a colourful airconditioned room at the Good Times Resort in Kanchanaburi
©2018 Regina Martins

Buddhist statues…

One of the many Buddhist relics at this sacred temple, Doi Suthep in Chiang Mai
©2018 Regina Martins

…and temples…

Doi Suthep, a golden Buddhist temple outside of Chiang Mai on the Mt Doi Suthep is truly spectacular
©2018 Regina Martins
The dragon keeps vigil over the 300 steep steps to reach Doi Suthep temple in Chiang Mai
©2018 Regina Martins

…to motorbikes…

I couldn’t resist taking a photo of this motorbike, all colourful down to the helmet. Bikes in South Africa are serious colours like black, blue and red
©2018 Regina Martins

and fresh produce at the market.

Our Thai cooking teacher took us to the market in Chiang Mai to buy ingredients for the delicious dishes we later made for dinner
©2018 Regina Martins

I hope you’ve enjoyed these pics of Thailand, a colourful place to visit.

Cee’s Fun Photo Challenge.

 

Click on image to go to source

Weekend Coffee Share 14.10.2018

Two cups of coffee down and I’m ready to share the week’s happenings over another one with you.

Monday and Tuesday I attended training. I wasn’t feeling 100% yet from the previous week’s sinus infection but I’m glad I went because I learnt some new things. The only crappy part was the traffic. The venue location meant that I needed to go across town through the bottleneck that is the M1. On Monday I drove home the long way just to miss the M1 traffic. It was longer but faster.

I was at the same venue on Wednesday, this time I was the one delivering the training. I run a simulation to help the concepts stick and I’m always amazed at what people can build in a short space of time with just paper, scissors, and glue.

On Thursday I met with a partner to discuss our upcoming facilitation course at The Art Farm, a delightful place out in the countryside. It felt wonderful being out amongst the trees, veld and wide open spaces. We got a lot of work done.

Friday was “office” day. That is a misnomer since my office is at home but you get the idea…calls, and admin. Che and I did go out for lunch to the Two Trees bakery, quite rustic, and it was nice to not be in a mall. While there, two very strong gusts of wind drove people inside from the garden, and the ensuing dust storm decreased visibility.

The weekend has been rather dreary, rainy and overcast and cool. At least the pool is getting filled with rainwater which is free. It’s snuggle with tea and toast weather.

Oh yes, I almost forgot…Che and I finished watching Nikita and went straight to bingeing on 12 Monkeys. It’s how we decompress. It’s proving to be intriguing and we even began doing timeline drawings of the backwards and forwards so as not to miss anything.

Have a great week ahead!

Weekend Coffee Share.

Other Weekend Coffee Share posts.

Click on image to go to source.

 

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Things People Play With

The splashes of colour come from the clothes of people of all ages playing with the white Legos. At the end of the exhibits at the STAM Ghent City Museum is a huge table piled high with white Legos.

All those white Legos, so inviting, no matter how young you are
©2018 Regina Martins
Strength and aesthetics
©2018 Regina Martins

What is it about Lego that is irresistible, and invites us to connect with our inner playful child…?

Interesting structure
©2018 Regina Martins

I admit that this was the first time I’ve seen so many white Legos – most unusual.

Piles and piles of white Lego
©2018 Regina Martins
I wonder which building this is supposed to be?
©2018 Regina Martins

Cee’s Fun Photo Challenge.

 

Finding A Place For My Hammock

In 2015 I came across this photo of Richard Branson lying in a hammock, on his phone, working…

Click on image to go to source

He has written about it a few times, here is an article, and it’s interesting that he notes that in the UK people don’t take leave, opting instead to remain in the office. Now, for me, that would lead to an unbalanced life.

I printed that photo and stuck it up in a place that I would look at various times a day. At the time I was working in a corporate, and it represented for me a change that I wanted to make in my life.

I wanted a more balanced life, one where I could work where I wanted when I wanted.

My dissatisfaction led me to write this article, and it was not long after that that I began working for the company I am with now. I have no office I go to – I’m either at a client, or I am at home. Or travelling.

My work has taken me to Berlin, Portugal, Barcelona, beautiful parts of the country I live in, Belgium and Thailand.

So, I pretty much can work where I want (no office to go to, yay!), the first part is done with a good level of satisfaction.

What I do now is the only work I know that I can take my wax crayons to work to create posters of information that help people integrate the learning a lot faster than powerpoint slides. Like this poster I created to explain Lean Thinking:

Lean Thinking explained in pictures
©2018 Regina Martins

I’m now working on the second part…the part about working when I want :-). This is proving to be a bit more challenging because it means having to let go of salary certainty and embracing uncertainty and risk.

Not my image, click to go to source

This will come I know. I just need to stop obsessing about it and enjoy the present. In the meantime, I still have that photo up where I can look at it several times a day.

Here are 4 different ways that help me deal with uncertainty:

  1. Meditation – it helps me focus on the present and deal with stress and anxiety. I’m not doing nearly enough meditation.
  2. Adaptive action – taking just one move at a time while keeping a view of the big picture, much like playing chess. Just decide on what my next wise move is and focus on that because that leads me to my next wise move and so on. That way I remain adaptive to change.
  3. Nature – being in nature grounds me and helps me keep my balance. I don’t get out to nature often enough. Sometimes just having the doors and windows open, letting the outside in and enjoying the sounds of the birds singing is enough to tide me over until I can get out into the countryside.
  4. Journaling – writing, journaling, reflecting on my inner thoughts. This helps me see clarity, usually not in the moment of writing, but later. The act of putting thoughts down on paper is therapy in itself. Journaling doesn’t have to be long descriptive narratives. Sometimes all I have time and energy for are bullet points, and that’s ok.
Click on image for source

Here’s to being comfortable with uncertainty, open to infinite possibilities, so that I can find a place for my hammock.

 

Don’t Complete The Puzzle!

Don’t complete the puzzle! So says Malcolm Gladwell, author of Blink, The Tipping Point and countless New Yorker articles.

If you’ve read any of his books or articles you’ll know what he means. A perfect argument is too obvious and boring and doesn’t engage people. Maybe the first 3 paragraphs will, but that’s as far as people will get before moving on to another article.

I can attest to this – the article has got to grab me in the first paragraph, never mind 3, for me to stay with it. I need some large puzzle pieces to be left for me to figure out where they’ll fit.

I began Malcolm Gladwell’s Writing Masterclass this week. He’s an incredible storyteller, and demonstrates the imperfect narrative in his stories, as he meanders from one story to the next until, finally, he comes full circle to where he began only to leave the listener, or reader with an open-ending, for the listener, or reader, to figure out for themselves.

This is irritating but it’s what keeps people talking about the article long after they’ve finished reading it, trying to put the puzzle pieces together. Humans love puzzles because we have a need for things to fit just so, but life isn’t always a neat puzzle.

So the key to memorable writing is to write an incomplete puzzle, an imperfect narrative that draws people in and keeps them talking long after they’re done with it as they try to solve it and make it fit just so.

 

Social Entrepreneur, chief wide eyed in wanderer, wonderer and bottlewasher

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