Category Archives: Ghent

G Is For Gravensteen Castle

It now houses the Justice Museum along with its collection of torture equipment and weapons. The Gravensteen Castle in Ghent is spine-chilling. Also known as the Castle of the Counts, it’s a medieval fortress, with restored stonework, complete with an enclosed keep and 24 towers.

Gravensteen Castle
©2018 Regina Martins

The torture and weapons exhibit is an experience, complete with sound-effects of screaming people coming from the depths of the castle…the dungeon!

Gravensteen Castle
©2018 Regina Martins

The impressive military architecture conveys power and strength which has seen many battles since the times of the Roman occupation.

Gravensteen Castle
©2018 Regina Martins

The torture part of the museum comes complete with a guillotine and an example of torture. Have a look…

Gravensteen Castle
©2018 Regina Martins
Gravensteen Castle
©2018 Regina Martins

For locals, the castle eventually came to symbolise oppression and the abuse of power and it was allowed to decay until it was bought by the government and restored to what it looks like today.

Gravensteen Castle
©2018 Regina Martins

It’s an experience, not for the faint-hearted.

 

Ghent Street Scenes

I’d rather be taking photos of people going about their business, laughing, loving and living, than taking landscape photos. I’m much better at it.

I enjoyed snapping these pics of people on the streets of Ghent one icy winter evening in January. In spite of the cold, there was so much movement, which I tried to capture, fleeting moments of people just being themselves.

Winter street scene, people rushing home
©2018 Regina Martins
Photographing the photographers, even if they were taking a selfie
©2018 Regina Martins
Bicycles, waiting for their owners to take them home…
©2018 Regina Martins

 

An Ever-Changing Sketchbook

Just before catching the tram to the station I managed a quick stroll along Werregarenstraatje. It helped it was right across from my hotel. It was devised as a temporary project during the 1995 Ghent Festivities and this alley still serves as an ever-changing sketchbook, a demo of current street art and especially as a blank canvas for Ghent’s many graffiti artists. The tags and pieces change daily and sometimes the entire alley is painted over so that a new blank canvas is created all over again. In this rule-free zone the spray can rules, the artists respecting works that are better than theirs (Ghent City Guide).

Tourguide.