Category Archives: Language and words

My Biggest Words Of 2016

It is not surprising that my biggest word for 2016 was Home. I wrote about Home and Identity many times on these pages this year. With all the travelling I have done, coming back home was awesome. I enjoy travelling and seeing new places and I do it because I know I have my home to come back to, to ground, recharge and reconnect with myself.

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A to Z Challenge: W is for Words

Communication is all in the language. Your message will be understood or not understood based on the words you use. This is pretty obvious. There are other considerations when choosing the right words to convey your message. This is what the rest of this post is about.

Continue reading A to Z Challenge: W is for Words

The road to hell is paved with adverbs

Stephen King said that the sin of telling often begins with adverbs, and that for writers, the road to hell is paved with adverbs.

I’m experimenting with adverb free writing. Apparently adverbs are not my friends.

The purpose of adverb-free writing is to create vivid pictures and meaning with strong precise verbs rather than using adverbs as a crutch.

The use of adverbs is commonplace. Our conversations are peppered with adverbs qualifying our verbs. Krista from WordPress wrote:

Adverbs…are words that modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. They’re the ones that usually end in -ly. Adverbs, like the passive voice, seem to have been created with the timid writer in mind….With adverbs, the writer usually tells us he or she is afraid he/she isn’t expressing himself/herself clearly, that he or she is not getting the point or the picture across.

Instead of using adverbs as a crutch, rely on strong verbs to convey emotional qualities that imbue your writing with nuance, allowing the reader to fire up their imagination. Consider, for example:

“She walked proudly out the door.”

Remove the adverb “proudly” and replace it with a strong verb to denote how she walked:

She strutted out the door.

She sashayed out the door.

She flounced out the door.

Each example connotes the emotion with which “she” moved, creating a more vivid picture than “proudly” ever could.

Read on…adverb free writing…the story is true.

I turned the key, the engine sputtered to life, and died. I waited 10 seconds and turned the key once more. This time the engine did not even turn, the click click click of the ignition confirming my worst suspicions.

Through a process of elimination Che concluded that the battery was fine. The problem was much more serious – electrical fault!

A call to the Hyundai service centre yielded an unhelpful “sorry we can’t fetch your car” response to my plea for help. Needless to say I was not charmed. I made a promise that I would find any service centre to fix my car as long as it was not a Hyundai one. 

Che then offered to fix my car. He works from home and had some spare time this week. So that is how, for 3 days this week, he chauffeured me to work and back. 

This commute was characterised by debate, storytelling and laughter. We made an event out of this break from normality – each evening, on our way home we enjoyed dinner at a different restaurant.  

The alternator turned out to be fine. The malfunction was caused by one of the 120 amp fuses blowing when Che connected the battery to the charger. Lesson learnt.

A wonderful Che washed and valet my car too. Shame, I don’t often get it washed. And it smells nice inside courtesy of lavender scented dash polish. So my car is happy.  And I am happy that I did not have to lash out much cash to resolve the issue.

In order to write the above without adverbs I wrote the piece as I would blog it, then proceeded to identify and replace adverbs with strong verbs.

A respectable effort, don’t you think?

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It’s not just semantics – words are everything

I once read a quote that goes something like this : Wild horses will not be able to catch hurtful words once they have been spoken. I don’t remember who said it and there’s a good chance that it’s not properly quoted either (apologies to the quotee*).

In any event, the point of using that quote is to explain that words are everything. People often dismiss what someone else is saying because they’re using different words to theirs and they say, “It’s just semantics!”

Well, it’s not just semantics. Words carry meaning beyond that ascribed in the dictionary. Each person interprets words differently, and give them different meaning.

Words are powerful. See the pic below and tell me how you feel after reading it…

The power of words
The power of words

How beautiful is that…?

 

This post is in response to WordPress's daily prompt: A Name For Yourself. Click here for more interpretations of today's prompt.

*Quotee – a made up word