A Tale Of Two Countries

Originally published on HarsH ReaLiTy’s Project H on September 29, 2016.

They say that home is where the heart is. I don’t know who “they” are but “they” seem to be telling us a lot of things that unfiltered could make life confusing. But I digress.

Home is a city in South Africa. In Gauteng province to be exact. This province is the smallest but is the economic hub of the country and the African continent. It also boasts South Africa’s capital city, Pretoria. What do “they” say about dynamite coming in small packages? I digress again…in any event, the photo below shows the area in which I live, south of Johannesburg in a beautiful peri-urban environment.

If you look really carefully, to the right of the photo, you can see the cows crossing the road, herded by a dog and cow-herder, to graze on the other side of the road. This may give you the wrong idea of SA – cows don’t cross the roads all the time and we aren’t dodging elephants and lions on a daily basis. It’s a country like all others in some respects. I’m lucky to live in an area that is so close to nature.

Why did the cattle cross the road?
©2016 Regina Martins

South Africa (henceforth SA) wasn’t always my home. I was born in Mozambique which was my home for the first 9 years of my life. Political upheaval uprooted our young family and because my Dad had always wanted to live in SA, SA became our new home.

What with learning a new language and somewhat traumatised with the splitting up of my extended family to whom I was close, the foundations of my 9 year old world were shaken to the core. It took me over 20 years to feel that SA was my home. Initially I’d been made to feel an outsider, an immigrant from across the border. It wasn’t nice for a young child to experience that. But it made me stronger and more determined not to allow other people to prescribe to me.

I remember the day, to the moment, that I finally felt that this beautiful rainbow country of all sorts of contrasts was home. My husband, Che and I spent a couple of weeks in Portugal for my brother-in-law’s wedding in 2001. It was winter there, rainy and cold and I was seriously miserable. I don’t like the cold and the wet at the best of times, but even worse than this was not seeing the sun. Living in Africa I have sunlight about 350 out of 365 days of the year. That’s a lot of sunlight, even in the winter.

During those two weeks the feeling that I was “a tourist that could speak the language” began to take hold. Everywhere I went people remarked on my accent, some not kindly. Portuguese, just like English, is spoken differently in different parts of the world. Those of us in SA have a different accent and colloquialisms than those who live in Brazil or Portugal for example. I realised that cultural communities living outside of the country of origin develop their own identity and sets of values like those of the country they’ve adopted.

In 2001, as the wheels of the Boeing 747 touched down at Johannesburg International Airport I began to cry with the overwhelming feeling of belonging to SA and of having come home.

I still have family and friends in Portugal and I’m lucky to be able to visit them. I feel comfortable there. I can do things there that I can’t do in SA, like walk the streets without looking over my shoulder. I enjoy exploring the most beautiful slice of the Iberian Peninsula and immersing myself in the incredible history of that country which goes back thousands of years. I love navigating the narrow roads of old Lisbon, steeped in history and enjoy that our family’s apartment is in one of those narrow roads, shown in the photo below.

Beautiful Lisbonne
©2016 Regina Martins

I feel a patriotic fervour when it comes to the Portuguese soccer team and when they won the Euro 2016 on Sunday I jumped up and down, laughed and cried and felt proud to be able to claim a part of that nationality. South African sports are exceptionally well represented internationally and I feel an equally patriotic fervour when they compete internationally.

I feel emotionally proud to live in a country that Nelson Mandela called home and to have been part of those historical elections in 1994 when previously disenfranchised people stood in queues for many hours waiting for their moment to put a cross on a ballot paper for the very first time.

When I visit Portugal I still get comments about my Portuguese accent. In South Africa, sometimes, people notice a slight undertone of an exotic accent to the way I speak English and ask me about it. I choose to ignore the less kind comments and embrace the diversity that make me who I am.

I feel Portuguese. I feel South African. I am both.

Finding my place…

 

7 thoughts on “A Tale Of Two Countries”

  1. Olá Regina,
    Como o mundo é pequeno, também nasci em Moçambique. Entrei só agora na blogesfera, sou um iniciante nestas andanças.
    Tudo de bom para si, família e amigos
    Paulo

    1. Olá Paulo, é mesmo! Como o mundo é pequeno. De Moçambique os meus Pais vieram para a África do Sul onde estamos desde 1974. Aqui fazemos a nossa vida. Embora não ter nascido aí eu adoro Portugal.

  2. Well expressed Regina, I like the way you describe life in SA there is a tendency of people thinking that Africa is still like it was when the explorers first set foot on our lands.
    I also like how you have embraced belonging to two countries which resonates with many who as a result of political upheaval had to move to other countries for safety.
    Thank you for thought provoking post.

  3. Shoe… a story of survival, of making the most in life, with what life offers you!
    I must say, having lived in Ireland now for 16 years (and never feeling like this is truly home, never feeling fully accepted) I yearn for Portugal!
    I won’t ever forget how “at home” we felt during our first visit to the Algarve. I’ll never forget the lump in my throat when we sat in the oceanarium – the memories of Port Elizabeth! I’ll never forget the lump in my throat when we saw the plaque at Cape St Vincent – the Diaz Cross, three languages – Portuguese, English and Afrikaans!
    I yearn for Portugal… yes, its only a dream but I think my distant heritage roots me there! I dream!

    1. That’s so beautiful! The distant call of heritage, I love that expression. We are children of different countries, heritages, continents, and I guess home is what we feel in our hearts.

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